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Mapping Your Future

Senior Checklist at the end of First Semester

Senior Checklist at the end of First Semester –

Good communication, discuss expectations with parents – grades, behavior, financial contribution, money management and visits home.

Be aware of adjustments, both practical and emotional, that you will face in college.

ACT Tests, etc.

Stay focused on grades and extracurricular activities.  Leadership roles?

Start a file.  Keep every document for financial aid or admissions in its proper folder.

Career Fairs, Job Shadows, etc.

Help for deciding on a career path – RUReadyND.com, see Mrs. Nelson about your career folder and assessment results, ask yourself these questions:

                What classes do you enjoy?

                What type of job or career appeals to you?

                What are your strengths, interests, skills, passions, likes?

                How much education or training do you want to take?

                What’s important to you and what do you want to accomplish in your life?

Find a fit –           Does the college you are considering have the major you are interested in?

                                Do you want to be close to home?

                                What are the costs and average student debt?

                                Do you want a small or large campus?

                                What is the job placement rate?

                                Do they offer internships?

                                What is the school’s graduation rate?

                                What activities, sports and organizations are available?

                                What is the student-to-professor ratio?

A COLLEGE VISIT WHILE SCHOOL IS IN SESSION IS THE BEST WAY TO LEARN ABOUT A COLLEGE

 

College applications –

                Pay close attention to deadlines.

                Write important dates in your planner.

                Make copies of all the college applications you send.

                Think about letters of recommendations.

                Have official test scores mailed directly to the colleges on your list.

                Request copies of your transcript be sent to college choices.

                Monitor your applications.

                TALK TO YOUR PARENTS.

FINANCIAL AID APPLICATION –                 FAFSA IS A free application.  Through the FAFSA you are applying for a variety of student financial aid programs such as grants, work-study and student loans.

                Apply EARLY

                Complete the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.govas soon after January 1stas possible.

                File income taxes as soon as possible.  In order to successfully use the IRS Data Retrieval option when completing your FAFSA application, you must have filed a federal tax return.  Information from electronically filed returns will be available within 2 weeks; paper tax returns will take up to 8 weeks.

                Keep the Personal Identification Number (PIN) you use to sign your FAFSA.  You can use it in the future to sign for loans.

                Follow up with financial aid offices.

                Get an early estimate with FAFSA4caster.  This free online tool outlines the type and amount of federal aid you could be eligible to receive.  Visit FAFSA4caster.ed.gov.

               

Other financial aid: 

Scholarships, employer or military assistance, vocational rehabilitation, web searches, school website, etc.

Dollars for Scholars   nddfs.org

Do not ever pay money for scholarship applications, etc.

Talk to Faye Brosy Nelson

 

Exceptional Resource For Help In Planning Your Future.....

mappingyourfuture.org

Another great website

The Department of Defense's Joint Advertising Market Research and Studies

(JAMRS) program announced today it has launched http://www.myfuture.com, a new website to help America's youth explore opportunities for their future.

Myfuture.com provides comprehensive, unbiased information about career, education and military options for young people, ages 16 to 24.

 

http://www.myfuture.com/

Career Resource from Job Service

There is an exciting new resource from Job Service. 

Careers in North Dakota is a comprehensive publication that covers nearly everything you ever wanted to know about career opportunities in North Dakota including employment projections, wages, core tasks, work activities, skills, knowledge, and typical education/training requirements. Additionally, we’ve tagged those occupations that are high demand, high wage, and belong to one of five skill clusters. Also, there’s the ability to cross-reference each occupation with a Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code, career cluster, or general interest area. This publication should be used as a general guide for career exploration, not as the sole determinant of a career direction or choice.

 

Go to http://www.ndworkforceintelligence.com/gsipub/index.asp?docid=520 and click on the red cover graphic.  One word of advance warning – they made a decision to change the career clusters a bit so you will see that when you get to this publication.  I don’t think it will be too difficult to find what you need in spite of that change.

 

Enjoy and, if you like this resource, be sure to let Job Service know!  Duane Broschat (dbroscha@nd.gov) and his Labor Market Information team work hard to get this data in a readable and understandable form. 

Your Invitation to Go See Campus

Student and Parents prepare for the college search. 

The "Advice" section guides them through campus visits and finding the right school, while the interactive "Community" answers their college questions.  At Go See Campus, students will dsicover college reviews, campus visit reports and more.

Get access now at www.GoSeeCampus.com/professional

Interesting Career Information - New Jobs You've Never Heard Before

 

The latest directory of job titles from Occupational Information Network (O*Net)  http://online.onetcenter.org/ features a variety of new entries that many people have never heard before.
 
Some of these jobs -- at least the duties -- have been around in some form for a while. What's new is a "professional pathway" for these careers, according to employment expert and author Laurence Shatkin. "O*Net officially recognizes job titles once there is a critical mass of workers in those jobs and a clear road map for attaining the positions," he says.
 
Green Energy
 
There are many new green-collar job titles on O*Net, which is developed for the U.S. Department of Labor. The number of new green jobs is not surprising, given the federal government's active role in building a green economy.
 
Even before the federal stimulus dollars kicked in, wind energy was big and growing. The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) reports that the wind industry grew by 45 percent in 2007 alone. Civil engineers who work on various aspects of the wind farm now have their own job category: wind farm engineers. These engineers work on performance of turbines and the overall performance of the wind farm and also oversee aspects of construction and mechanical development. They usually have a B.S. in engineering with a focus in construction or civil or structural engineering. Some technical colleges now offer degrees in wind farm engineering. AWEA pegs the average salary at $80,000.
 
Solar thermal technicians design, develop, install, and maintain solar thermal systems used to heat water and produce energy. Renewable energy plants, companies that install solar panels for domestic use, construction companies, consulting firms, and hotel chains use these technicians. A degree (2- or 4-year) in mechanical engineering or electronics is helpful, but some apprenticeship programs exist as well.
 
Salaries vary widely and will increase if demand continues to outstrip supply. Solar thermal technicians can expect to start at around $40,000 a year or $20 an hour, according to Red Rocks Community College in Colorado. The upper salary limit is a moving target, as the job category is emerging so quickly.
 
Health Care
 
Nursing informatics is a nursing specialty that integrates nursing science, computer science, and information science to manage and communicate data, information, knowledge, and wisdom in nursing practice. Informatics nurse specialists are registered nurses trained in graduate level informatics. Salaries start at $60,000 but can more than double after a few years' experience. "Most often they are liaisons between clinicians and information and computer science people. These jobs are growing because information technology is now becoming a major tool in health-care settings," says Stacey Prince of the American Nurses Association
 
Anesthesiologist assistants work under the direction of a licensed and qualified anesthesiologist in hospitals. They perform preoperative tasks, support therapy, recovery room care, and intensive care support. They do well money-wise: around $90,000 to start and more than double that with 10 years of experience, according to the American Medical Association. A master's degree in nursing and certification by the National Commission for Certification of Anesthesiologist Assistants are required.
 
Business and Management
 
The roles of IT professionals continue to splinter and become more specialized as new technologies dominate businesses. Business continuity planners are responsible for developing plans to recover from cyber attacks, terrorism, or natural disasters. They also may be responsible for scaling IT as a company grows (from regional to national, for example), duties that used to be handled by information systems managers. A bachelor's degree in business, management, or disaster management is the minimum requirement. The median wage for disaster recovery managers, who have a similar job description, is $100,000, according to salary.com.
 
America's interest in getting healthy has led to a growing business specialization of spa managers, who are employed by resorts, health clubs, and other facilities offering sports and wellness activities. The median income for spa managers in the U.S. is $56,000. A college degree is not mandatory, but a high school diploma or GED and at least five years experience in the managing a related area are usually required.
 
Education
 
Distance learning, which provides instruction to students who are not on-site, is booming. O*Net now recognizes distance learning coordinators, who prepare and run online courses at colleges, trade schools and secondary schools. A master's degree instructional design, curriculum design, curriculum development is usually required, as is a strong understanding of Web-based technologies.
 
The Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't yet recognize distance learning coordinators as a job category, but an analysis of job openings shows a range from the upper $30s to the low $60s for a coordinator with at least two years' experience.
 
Entertainment and Media
 
Video game designers have been around for a while, but as the $9 billion interactive entertainment industry matures, new specialties are emerging, such as user experience designer, which focuses solely on improving the user interaction. Designers can also move up to be creative directors as well. A college degree is still not mandatory everywhere, however, strong skills in computer programming, computer engineering, software development, computer animation, graphic design, and computer graphics -- or all of them - are helpful.
 
Big employers like Microsoft and Electronic Arts snag a large chunk of new designers, but smaller companies are starting to offer competitive wages and career tracks as well. Designers earn $50,000 and $80,000 annually, and the highest reported salary was $200,000, according to the International Game Developers Association.
 
Social media is a specialty field of public relations that uses the growing social networking technologies, including RSS, Twitter, Facebook, and blogs. A few years ago, social media duties were performed by marketing managers or communications directors. Now there is a social media career track.
 
An entry-level company blogger can earn less than $20 per hour (and many blogging jobs are part-time). A director of social media, the top of the social media chain, can pull in $70,000 or more. In the middle, a social media manager, can expect to earn around $50,000. A bachelor's degree is usually required, and job seekers should possess strong writing abilities and a keen understanding of online marketing, public relations, and new media.
 
by Larry Buhl
Yahoo.com
October 10, 2009
 
 
James R. Stone III
Professor and Director
National Research Center for Career Technical Education
University of Louisville
350 Education Building
Louisville, KY 40292
Office   (502) 852-0639
Mobile (502) 322-6260
www.NRCCTE.org
 


 

Power Point Presentation to help you make decisions for your future.....

Excellent Site developed by Steve Beutler, School Counselor from Minot

Green Energy Jobs

Green Energy

There are many new green-collar job titles on O*Net, which is developed for the U.S. Department of Labor. The number of new green jobs is not surprising, given the federal government's active role in building a green economy.

Even before the federal stimulus dollars kicked in, wind energy was big and growing. The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) reports that the wind industry grew by 45 percent in 2007 alone. Civil engineers who work on various aspects of the wind farm now have their own job category: wind farm engineers. These engineers work on performance of turbines and the overall performance of the wind farm and also oversee aspects of construction and mechanical development. They usually have a B.S. in engineering with a focus in construction or civil or structural engineering. Some technical colleges now offer degrees in wind farm engineering. AWEA pegs the average salary at $80,000.

Solar thermal technicians design, develop, install, and maintain solar thermal systems used to heat water and produce energy. Renewable energy plants, companies that install solar panels for domestic use, construction companies, consulting firms, and hotel chains use these technicians. A degree (2- or 4-year) in mechanical engineering or electronics is helpful, but some apprenticeship programs exist as well.

Salaries vary widely and will increase if demand continues to outstrip supply. Solar thermal technicians can expect to start at around $40,000 a year or $20 an hour, according to Red Rocks Community College in Colorado. The upper salary limit is a moving target, as the job category is emerging so quickly.

New North Dakota Career Planning Site

www.RUReadyND.com

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED - this site is North Dakota's career information center, test preparation site, and decision-making system.

More Excellent Career Exploration Sites

North Dakota Career Resource Network - http://www.nd.gov/cte/crn/

O-Net - http://online.onetcenter.org/

Occupational Outlook Handbook - http://www.bls.gov/oco/

CareerOneStop - http://www.careeronestop.org/

Vocational Information Center - http://khake.com/

 

Preparing for College Information

Summer tasks for graduating seniors

June

  • Plan for college transportation.
  • Notify your high school guidance office of your college selection and any scholarships received.
  • Follow up with the financial aid office to ensure all paperwork is complete.

July

  • Save money from your summer job.
  • Send “thank you notes” to everyone who helped you plan and prepare for college.
  • Make copies of your financial aid forms, health forms, etc for your files to aid in resolving future issues.

Mapping Your Future offers free career planning information, services for students

Many high school and college graduates may be wondering about finding a job in a difficult economy.

Mapping Your Future (MappingYourFuture.org), a national nonprofit organization, provides free resources to help job seekers prepare for the challenges of the current job market. Students and others can use the online career planning information and resources to plan their job search or determine opportunities in their areas of interest.

“Mapping Your Future offers a variety of resources that help students begin their job search,” said Cathy Mueller, executive director of Mapping Your Future. “Right now is an excellent time to use the free resources on Mapping Your Future. High school and college graduates are entering a challenging job market, and the information and services on Mapping Your Future can help them prepare for those challenges.”

The free “explore career” resources, located at mappingyourfuture.org/planyourcareer/, include a variety of information:

  • Assessing skills and interests
  • Developing a career plan
  • Researching careers
  • Finding work
  • Reviewing other online job guidance and job search resources

In addition, for those students, graduates, and parents who have experienced a change in their income and who also are repaying a federal student loan, there are options available to manage student loan payments. Mapping Your Future provides information online about loan deferment and forbearance options. Students, graduates, and parents may also contact their lender directly for more information.


Show Me the Future educates, entertains

More than 58,621 individuals have played Mapping Your Future’s Show Me the Future® (showmethefuture.org), the free online life skills and money management game, since it was implemented three years ago on March 31, 2006.

Players have been from all fifty states and various other countries. The majority of players was female, and more than half of the players indicated middle school as their last education level completed. It is evident that schools, especially middle schools, are promoting and using the game. Players are required to provide their school name, latest education level, and zip code—making it easy for Mapping Your Future staff to identify patterns.

Show Me the Future is an interactive feature, designed for middle and high school students. It teaches life skills and money management and helps students understand that the decisions they make today can have a life-long impact.

During the game, players are randomly assigned a career (with salary, educational requirements, and accompanying student loan debt, if applicable), and family status (married or single with one, two, or three children). The players then make the following decisions:

  • Housing: rent or own with various price levels for each status
  • Transportation: Public transportation or purchase a vehicle from various cost options
  • Groceries: low-, medium-, or high-cost packages
  • Childcare, if applicable
  • Insurance: home owners/renters, automobile, health, life
  • Clothing: low-, medium-, or high-cost options
  • Charitable contributions
  • Investments/savings

After making these decisions, the game reflects how much money is left in the monthly budget. Thus, students have the opportunity to witness a direct correlation between their wants and needs and their career and financial choices. Students can play multiple times to determine if they are making more financially sound decisions.

To promote Show Me the Future to your students and families, you can distribute bookmarks that feature both Show Me the Future and CareerShip®, Mapping Your Future's online career exploration tool. To request a free supply (in quantities of 100), send an e-mail to feedback@mappingyourfuture.org.

A Mapping Your Future project team is working on enhancements to the game, including a plan to offer regionalized versions of the game for more realistic costs. If you have questions about Show Me the Future, or suggestions for enhancements, e-mail feedback@mappingyourfuture.org.

The North Dakota Career Resource Network has a new web site with excellent resources for students, educators and parents.

                     http://www.nd.gov/cte/crn

                         

Check out this excellent resource to help you make choices about your future:

                                             http://mappingyourfuture.org

 

Here's another excellent site:   www.college.gov